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2017 is so unexpectedly warm it is freaking out climate scientists

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ThinkProgress

January–June 2017 global surface temperatures (compared to the 20th century average) in Degrees Celsius. Source: ThinkProgress

January–June 2017 global surface temperatures (compared to the 20th century average) in Degrees Celsius. Source: ThinkProgress

Normally, the hottest years on record occur when the underlying human-caused global warming trend gets a temporary boost from an El Niño’s enhanced warming in the tropical Pacific.

So it’s been a surprise to climate scientists that 2017 has been so remarkably warm — because the last El Niño ended a year ago.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) reported Tuesday that the first half of 2017 was the second-warmest January-June on record for Earth, topped only by 2016, which was boosted by one of the biggest El Niños on record.

“As if it wasn’t shocking enough to see three consecutive record-breaking years, in 2014, 2015, and 2016, for the first time on record,” leading climatologist Michael Mann wrote in an email to ThinkProgress,“we’re now seeing near-record temperatures even in the absence of the El Nino ‘assist’ that the previous record year benefited from.”

How January-June temperatures globally rank compared to the 20th century average. Source: ThinkProgress

How January-June temperatures globally rank compared to the 20th century average. Source: ThinkProgress

NOAA climatologist Ahira Sanchez-Lugo told Climate Central, “After the decline of the strong El Niño, I was expecting the values to drop a bit…. This year has been extremely remarkable.”

Usually we see global records in years when the short-term El Niño warming adds to the long-term global warming trend (see chart below).

As NOAA noted in its March report, without an El Niño, no month before March 2017 had ever exceeded the “normal” temperature (the 1981–2010 average) by a full 1.8°F (1.0°C).

Global monthly temperature departures (from 1981–2010 average) color-coded by whether the Pacific was experiencing an El Niño (red), a La Niña (blue) or neutral conditions (gray). Source: ThinkProgress

Global monthly temperature departures (from 1981–2010 average) color-coded by whether the Pacific was experiencing an El Niño (red), a La Niña (blue) or neutral conditions (gray). Source: ThinkProgress

This matters because when a month — or six-month period — sees record high global temperatures in the absence of an El Niño, that is a sign the underlying global warming trend is stronger than ever.

The latest NOAA report is “a reminder that climate change has not, despite the insistence of climate contrarians ‘paused’ or even slowed down,” Mann said.

Bottom line: Human-caused global warming continues at a dangerous pace, and only human action to slash carbon pollution can stop it.

Source: ThinkProgress. Reproduced with permission.  

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  • Peter F

    must not have got the memo. Temperatures haven’t increased for 20 years didn’t you kno

    • Joe

      The Bolt in his Rupert owned Daily Telegraph news rag continually bleats about ‘climate change alarmists’ and that there has been no warming. The Bolter and his mates of course never address the recorded temperature measurements, and that each decade since the 1970’s have been warmer than the decade before. One bonus for ocean swimmers like myself is that all year ocean swimming is now a joy to behold. Winter swimming is no longer feared as the water temp at the moment will attest…end of July in Sydney and ocean water temp is still 20 degrees…its not normal!!!!!

      • solarguy

        Joe, if your correct about 20 degrees, that definitely isn’t normal for July!

    • David Rice

      “Temperatures haven’t increased for 20 years….”

      Why do all of the world’s geophysicist state the opposite. Where did the missing ice go? LOL!

  • Craig Allen

    I don’t think this belongs under the ‘other good stuff’ heading 🙁

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