France rolls out tenders for 20GW solar capacity by 2023 | RenewEconomy

France rolls out tenders for 20GW solar capacity by 2023

France greenlights raft of new tenders for solar energy, including a three-fold increase in installed PV capacity, eyeing 20GW by 2023.

share
The new tenders will aim to boost France's DG, BIPV and large-scale storage sectors over the coming decade. Sunways

PV Magazine

The new tenders will aim to boost France's DG, BIPV and large-scale storage sectors over the coming decade. Sunways
The new tenders will aim to boost France’s DG, BIPV and large-scale storage sectors over the coming decade.
Sunways

French environment and energy minister Segolene Royal greenlights raft of new tenders for solar energy, including a three-fold increase in installed PV capacity, eyeing 20 GW by 2023.

The French environment and energy minister Segolene Royal announced this week the introduction of a number of new solar tenders in France for the development of various PV applications.

Chiefly, France is aiming to triple its solar PV capacity to 20 GW by 2023, with the tenders expected to hit incremental goals of 10.2 GW by 2018, and between 18.2 to 20.2 GW by 2023.

Other tenders announced aim to support France’s stuttering building integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) sector, with the French government earmarking 450 MW of BIPV tenders over the coming three years. Another tender will be aimed solely at the country’s self-consumption sector, particularly in C&I and agriculture, while 1 GW of tenders for ground mounted PV will be issued annually for the next six years.

An additional 50 MW tender for solar+storage has also been introduced for France’s overseas territories.

This latest suite of support for solar development follows the previous round of tenders – first introduced in 2014 – that have collectively attracted more than $1 billion in investment into France’s solar PV industry. Experts in the country believe that the certainty offered by this approach will curry further favor with investors, and should particularly help boost France’s ground-mount and BIPV sectors.

The plans were first announced by the Conseil Superieur de L’Energie (CSE) in April, which outlined how France will embrace further its use of solar and wind energy. However, the CSE confirmed that there will be no nuclear plant closures before 2019, but affirmed that nuclear’s share of the energy mix will fall from 75% currently to 50% by 2025.

For solar, the cumulative target for 2023 is relatively ambitious and certainly achievable. France currently has just over 6.2 GW of cumulative PV capacity installed – according to official figures from grid operator RTE – and added just under 1 GW of capacity in 2015. Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) expects France to add around, or just above, 1 GW of new capacity this year, but the hope is that these new tenders will accelerate that pace of installation.

Source: PV Magazine. Reproduced with permission.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

4 Comments
  1. Brunel 4 years ago

    Should have gone for 20GJ of storage instead.

    • Ian 4 years ago

      20GJ is 5 555KWH according to my unit converter . The question is why shouldn’t a country like France not promote solar power to a similar degree as Germany?

      Solar up to a certain percentage of power generation capacity, corresponds with the peak daytime consumption, at higher percentages it begins to compete with baseload type generation like nuclear or coal and at higher penetration percentages competes with itself.

      An analysis of why France would want to install so much solar would be interesting.

      Is it to replace aging nuclear, or to counteract Germany’s export of excess solar power, or simply to meet renewable targets? The expected uptake of EV may feature in their plan.

      • Brunel 4 years ago

        The south of France is more sunny than Germany I think.

        Maybe solar power in France will be cheaper than solar power in Germany.

      • Giles 4 years ago

        We’ve mentioned this before, France is reducing the % of nuclear from around 75% now to 50% by 2025, and aims for 40% renewables. As the government has said, this is mostly about managing costs. The bill just to upgrade and maintain its current fleet is horrendous enough, but the bill to replace its oldest reactors makes solar and wind an obviously cheaper choice.

Comments are closed.

Get up to 3 quotes from pre-vetted solar (and battery) installers.