Australian company creating SEA change towards electric trucks

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Melbourne-based SEA Electric says its technology to electrify trucks – both big and small – is delivering quick returns for fleet owners, and making drivers happy.

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Earlier this week, we reported on the announcement that Victoria would help fund a new electric vehicle factory in the Latrobe Valley with plans to assemble 2400 light commercial vehicles and commuter buses a year and employ as many as 500 locals.

Today, we look in a bit more detail at the company behind the news – SEA – and talk to founder and managing director Tony Fairweather.

SEA has been working on its proprietary world-first electric drive technology for six years, and while it’s only six months since the first road-going light commercials hit the streets,  the company is seeing sales success.

The company has recently signed a deal to deliver 10 SEA-equipped refuse trucks to New Zealand and there is lots of interest from Australian councils, plus potential tie-ups with major international light commercial vehicle manufacturers.

SEA packs – which include all the parts, including a built-in high-voltage charger – are designed to electrify a truck chassis or delivery van, and an easily be fitted on most leading trucking brands, giving a relatively quick and very efficient electric transformation.

The company – headquartered in Dandenong – has already successfully fitted systems to vehicles made by Isuzu, Mercedes-Benz, Hino, Iveco and XGW and FAW and is in talks to have the systems included in the factory of one of Japan’s largest commercial vehicle specialists.

Read the full story on RenewEconomy’s electric vehicle-dedicated site, The Driven…

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Tony Bosworth writes for www.TheDriven.io and RenewEconomy.com.au. He has 35 years experience in journalism, and has been instrumental in launching and editing several automotive magazines including Which Car? magazine in the UK.

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