rss
5

Graph of the Day: Electricity prices rises not driven by renewables

Print Friendly

We said it last week, via the ANU. But it bears repeating: The Australian states with least amount of new renewable energy (and more coal) have seen higher electricity price increases than those with more new wind and solar.

And this chart (below) from the Clean Energy Council this week illustrates the point really well.

As we noted in our story last week, the argument that a rapid shift to renewable energy generation, such as has been seen in South Australia, drives up consumer electricity prices has been thrown about a lot, lately, by the federal Coalition and right wing media outlets. But that’s not what the data says.

Messages Image(428563145)

The data, as reflected in the ANU report – which was commissioned by News Limited, but is available here – shows that average household electricity bills have increased less in renewables-rich South Australia over the past 10 years than they have in Australia’s eastern states, which are predominantly powered by coal and gas-fired generation.

Of course, for the full story, we recommend reading that report. But as the old saying goes, sometimes a picture tells a thousand words.  

Share this:

  • lin

    “The Australian states with least amount of new renewable energy (and more coal) have seen higher electricity price increases than those with more new wind and solar”. Which may have something to do with why the LibNats hate renewables so much – less money for their donor mates. These guys seem to think we are there to be fleeced, milked, screwed and slaughtered for the enrichment of their handlers.

  • trackdaze

    No no please dont….not the graph of truth….. anything but the graph of truth.

  • DevMac

    Other than SA, the Orange graph looks like Malcolm’s approval rating?

  • Chris Fraser

    Tas appears to be experiencing the lowest price increase of all. I think that’s because all the old hydro generation has been paid off. It will be similar story for other states in the future for all renewable investment with no ongoing fuel costs. They will all make energy with very little expense. Waiting for those days …

  • Phil

    That is a pointless correlation when it was network spending that drove the price increases.