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Graph of the Day: Another 16,000 homes add rooftop solar in July

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Australian households and business added another 70MW of rooftop solar in July, with more than 16,000 households adding rooftop solar systems in the month.

According to Green Energy Markets, the 16,601 rooftop solar systems took the total installs so far this year to more than 108,000, or a total of 450MW across the country.

Queensland continues to be the biggest market for rooftop solar, accounting for just over on third of all installations. Victoria is second, followed by NSW, WA and then South Australia.

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According to Green Energy Markets, commercial scale systems accounted for 19 per cent of installed capacity in the month of July, and 16 per cent of all installations so far this year. The biggest markets for commercial scale solar are in NSW, followed by Victoria and Queensland.

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  • Peter Wade

    Unfortunately that roughly equals the number of new dwellings constructed during the month. In other words (unless energy production exceeds total consumption for each of those new solar installations) there is no net gain. We can do better than that

    • John P

      WE can certainly do better than that but probably not until we get better leadership. We are still building homes that look good but waste enormous amounts of energy.

      • Ronald Bruce Jones

        When you consider the fact that the federal government and in some instances state governments are trying to undermine solar power it isn’t a bad effort

  • Ronald Brakels

    That’s a really impressive result. Feed-in tariffs have been cut to shreds to such an extent that many people are simply having the electricity they export to the grid stolen, but Australians still keep installing solar regardless. It makes me proud.

    According to the table South Australia has over 57 megawatts of rooftop solar installed. As rooftop solar generates around 77% of optimum output which is around 4.92 kilowatt-hours per kilowatt of capacity for most people in the state, and last financial year South Australia used 13.4 terrawatt hours of grid electricity, this means South Australia now gets about 7.6% of it’s total electricity use from solar. Adding in wind power this means that South Australia generates electricity equal to 40% of its total use from renewables. Good job!

  • ac baird

    Queensland leads the charge eh! Campbell’s must be proud, surely. Or alternatively, embarrassed. He should book an appointment with a shock-jock pal to lambast the ungrateful mob that inhabits his state. How can he hold his head up high with the Federal confreres? Don’t Queenslanders have any sensitivity? The sad thing is that the billing system is so stuffed, the reward of installation is very skewed.

    • david_fta

      It occurs to me that Campbell may be secretly happy about this, but is not able to publicly say so because the LNP is dependent on mining company funding.

  • RobS

    Can I just point out a most absurd irony. The Abbott government has just delivered the longest period without a cut in the rooftop solar REC rebate ever in its existence. Whilst the Labor government cut the rebate by 66% in their final 12 months in office we have now gone 12 months of Liberal rule with no cut at all. Perhaps coincidentally and perhaps not that same 12 months, the first with no progressive rebate trim, has also seen the smallest overall cost reduction in installed system costs in several years according to the solar choice August price survey. I truly beleive the long term staggered subsidy phase out was a strong factor in the rate of overall cost declines in solar as suppliers fought to reduce costs to offset the effects of the reductions. I certainly don’t hope the RET is cut altogether by the Abbott government but I think a return to something along the lines of a 10-20% cut per year would continue to spur efficiency and competition in the industry that has stagnated for the last 12 months.