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Category: Featured

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Australia has a climate policy again - sort of

Australia has a climate policy again – sort of

The Coalition’s Direct Action – lambasted by its own party as a policy of “fiscal recklessness” – is now officially Australia’s climate policy. No one believes it will meet its own modest targets, but it will allow native forests to be burned for carbon credits.

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Can Clive Palmer be trusted to protect renewable energy target?

Can Clive Palmer be trusted to protect renewable energy target?

Clive Palmer, who has helped Abbott government dump the carbon price and has now reversed his opposition to Direct Action, may now allow changes to the RET. He also says Australian coal is good for emissions reductions.

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Why energy storage already makes sense in Australia

Why energy storage already makes sense in Australia

Energy storage is already making financial sense in the Australian market, and it won’t be long until battery storage solutions become a compelling investment for households as well as business customers and network operators.

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How Coalition proposes to kill $20 billion renewables industry

How Coalition proposes to kill $20 billion renewables industry

Only a handful of small solar projects have been committed this year, showing the impact of the Coalition’s war on renewables. Meanwhile, new research reveals the true impact of a “real” 20 per cent target as Coalition plays fast and loose with targets.

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Will Australia be to world climate talks what Poland is to Europe?

Will Australia be to world climate talks what Poland is to Europe?

Europe has made the first substantive commitments of any major polluter towards an international climate deal. It puts a lie to Abbott government claims that the world is not acting, but raises fears that Australia could expand its role as a spoiler in international climate deal.

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AGL Energy calls for renewable energy target to be scrapped

AGL Energy calls for renewable energy target to be scrapped

AGL Energy – once the ‘greenest’ retailer in the country and now the largest producer of coal-fired energy – has called for the renewable energy target to be scrapped altogether.

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Renewable energy target about to get an Abbott-style haircut

Renewable energy target about to get an Abbott-style haircut

Only in Australia can a government proposal to slash the renewable energy target by more than half be proclaimed by the “experts” as a “victory” for the moderates. Such is the toxic nature of this government’s antipathy to all things clean and green, and wind farms in particular. Welcome to Team Australia. Open to vested interests.

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Wind power is more reliable than gas – and much cheaper, too

Wind power is more reliable than gas – and much cheaper, too

As Australia’s dance of the seven RET Reviews continues, it seems like a good time to revisit one of the more persistent anti-renewables myths bandied about by fossil fuel types (and most of the Abbott government): that that renewable energy is unreliable in meeting electricity demand.

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Was the Warburton Review a complete waste of money?

Was the Warburton Review a complete waste of money?

RET Review member paid enough for a 20kW solar system, as PM&C concedes Warburton Review went beyond terms of reference. This comes as the Climate Change Authority, which the Abbott government says it still wants to ditch, says it will complete its own report on the RET.

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 Could a Tesla test drive cure Abbott government’s deep denial?

Could a Tesla test drive cure Abbott government’s deep denial?

A test drive in a Tesla – and a collective “Tesla smile” in the conservative ranks – might give the Abbott government an insight into the future. And how the confluence of renewables, storage and software will shape the future. It is not so scary, and not some part of a green plot or climate hoax designed to bring down their society.

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Why rooftop solar makes networks such a hard sell

Why rooftop solar makes networks such a hard sell

New report says asset value of NSW networks needs to be written down by nearly half so they can compete with rooftop solar. If they don’t, consumers will be forced to pay more, many will leave the grid, and the assets will end up being stranded.