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Category: Featured

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Carbon crash, solar dawn: Deutsche Bank on why solar has already won

Carbon crash, solar dawn: Deutsche Bank on why solar has already won

Deutsche Bank says solar market is massive, will generate $5 trillion in revenue by 2030. It describes solar plus storage as next the killer app, and says even in India will be 25% solar by 2022.

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Even at $10/barrel, oil can’t match solar on cost

Even at $10/barrel, oil can’t match solar on cost

Major Gulf bank says oil cannot compete against latest solar prices, even at $10/barrel. It predicts massive investment in solar and wind in coming years, as Gulf region seeks to become centre for renewable financing and technology development, and as the oil industry fades.

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Big utilities charge into distributed energy, one step at a time

Big utilities charge into distributed energy, one step at a time

Australia’s biggest two utilities have decided they want to own the rooftop solar on homes and business, and maybe the storage and EVs too. RE interviews the executives behind the strategies, and their attempts to switch from a centralised model to a distributed future.

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Abbott government says war on renewables not over yet

Abbott government says war on renewables not over yet

The Abbott government may be in its death throes, but it is still determined to do as much damage to the renewable energy industry as it can. It still wants to cut the RET by one third, and dump agencies such as the CEFC and ARENA, and now it is targeting solar.

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Infigen calls bluff on utility threats to 'boycott' wind, solar

Infigen calls bluff on utility threats to ‘boycott’ wind, solar

Infigen calls bluff on utility threats to “boycott” renewable energy, but suggests corporate Australia may fill the gap if retailers don’t contract new wind and solar farms. Meanwhile, the market turns positive on renewables, even if the government is still stalling on the RET, while Infigen turns focus to the US solar market.

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Solar at 2c/kWh - the cheapest source of electricity

Solar at 2c/kWh – the cheapest source of electricity

New study says policy makers and energy planners still underestimating cost potential of solar. It says that within in a decade, it will be cheapest form of power and will fall to 2c/kWh.

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The year the climate 'dam of denial' breaks – ready for the flood?

The year the climate ‘dam of denial’ breaks – ready for the flood?

Could 2015 be the year the ‘dam of denial’ blocking climate action breaks? If it is, it won’t be due to politics, but to the market waking up to the economic threat posed by climate change and the economic opportunity in the inevitable decline of fossil fuels.

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If the Tea Party can go green, why can't Abbott's Australia?

If the Tea Party can go green, why can’t Abbott’s Australia?

Green Tea, anyone? A new branch of America’s Tea Party shows a growing number of US Conservatives ‘get’ renewables – particularly solar – and believe in the energy revolution that will turn old market models on their heads. So where are Australia’s renewable energy conservatives hiding?

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Is utility-scale solar finally about to take off in Australia?

Is utility-scale solar finally about to take off in Australia?

Australia should have longed been a leader in utility scale solar, but has been blocked by the fossil fuel industry and poor policy. Now there are signs that large scale solar is about to take off – both at the “mega” project level and in smaller, localised projects.

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Origin shifts retail focus to rooftop solar and battery storage

Origin shifts retail focus to rooftop solar and battery storage

Origin Energy says its ‘view of electricity markets has changed a little bit,’ signals retail market shift to solar and storage, and increased interest in utility-scale solar.

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Why your bank should offer to buy your solar output

Why your bank should offer to buy your solar output

Solar households are getting a lousy price for their solar exports, and Australian corporates have yet to step up and sign off-take agreements for large scale solar farms. That could change, if the banks decided to get involved and cut out the middle man.