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3D rooftop solar modeling tool maps output, savings for households

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A new online modelling tool allowing households to estimate their rooftop’s potential for solar PV – and to weigh up the energy and cost savings from installing rooftop solar – has been created by the Australian PV Institute.Screen Shot 2014-07-29 at 10.46.34 AM

The 3D Solar Potential Tool, part of a suite of updates to APVI’s Australian Solar Maps launched last Friday, was developed with $436,000 of ARENA support, and allows users to estimate output from a PV system on rooftops in capital cities, as well as financial savings and emissions offset.

The tool accounts for solar radiation and weather at the site; PV system area, tilt, orientation; and shading from nearby buildings and vegetation. Users can then alter the design of the system and adjust the feed-in tariff to improve the accuracy of savings estimates.

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A Solar Potential estimate taken from inner Brisbane

Also launched last week was a Solar Animation tool, showing the evolution of the PV market in Australia. The CER data on the Solar PV Status and Market Analyses was also updated and a new PV Postcode Data tool has been added for postcode level analysis.

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According to ARENA, more than 19,000 people had already visited APVI’s solar map website at the start of last week.

APVI CEO Lisa Miller said the maps are important resources for understanding the increasing role of PV in Australia, incorporating live generation data, historical information and interactive tools.

“This map is an important part of the work of the APVI to support the increased development and use of PV via research, analysis and information,” said Miller.

The new modelling tool and solar maps are available online: pv-map.apvi.org.au  

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  • Rob G

    The solar animation is particularly interesting. QLD roof top solar is astounding with about 25% of homes with solar. No wonder coal fire stations are worried. While WA are second with 18%. And ACT surprisingly low at 11%. I would think the verdict is pretty clear and that is: States that are more hostile towards large scale renewables projects (QLD namely) have the public taking more aggressive steps to obtain it themselves. While states like ACT and VIC that are much more welcoming of the large projects – the public feel less need to put it on the roof. Somewhat surprising and somewhat expected, Are QLDers looking to save more money because the have more sun? Are they annoyed at the states hostility and want to be in control of what they pay. Ultimately why such a big difference between states?

  • Harry

    I am surprised the percentage of homes with solar in NT is so low, would have thought that it would be relatively attractive to Territorians.